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Common Reasonable Accomodations

The following reasonable accommodations are not the only options that can be used as reasonable accommodations.

For Physical Disability

Common reasonable accommodations include, but are not limited to:

  • Making existing facilities accessible venues (meeting rooms, washrooms) where possible
  • Shifting activities to accessible rooms  
  • Flexible learning arrangements for training programmes (finding options close to a participants home)
  • Personal assistants (situations where these may be needed depend on the type of physical impairment, the severity and nature/ accessibility of the environment)

Note: Due to inaccessibility of public transportation in many rural areas, persons with physical impairments usually face difficulties using public means such as buses and mini vans to commute. A more convenient option for many is using motorcycles or private taxi’s that incur extra costs for transport. Providing extra transport facilitation to cover some of these additional costs can count as reasonable accommodation.

For Visual Impairments

Common reasonable accommodations include, but are not limited to:

  • Provision of Personal Assistants to help the individual to participate in activities
  • Access braille or large printed material where needed.
  • Acquisition of equipment when relevant (computers, phones, voice recorders) and/or assistive computer software such as JAWS (text-to-speech software)

For Hearing Impairments

Common reasonable accommodations include, but are not limited to:

  • Provision of Sign Language Interpreters
  • Provision of subtitles for any audio-visual material
  • Written information to back-up any audio communications.

Note: Hearing Impairments are diverse, ranging from hard-of-hearing to complete deafness. Some persons with hearing impairment are not conversant with sign language but may lip-read and speak quite coherently. This may be the case if the impairment occurred later in life after speech and language development. In this instance, written communication and provision of a personal assistant to help take notes during meetings/trainings would be a more efficient reasonable accommodation than a sign language interpreter. 

For Psychosocial Impairments

Common reasonable accommodations include, but are not limited to:

  • The ability to apply for extensions on assignments 
  • A clear emotional support and referral pathway
  • Access to a quiet space 
  • Frequent check-ins with a designated staff member
  • Extra time to complete training programmes

Note: Psychosocial Impairments vary significantly from person to person, and are not always present.  It is important to work with individuals with these challenges on an on-going basis to determine which supports they need at a given time.


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